Top 10 Exotic foods in Philippines

10. Stuffed Frog
“Betute Tugak”

Frog

Farmers in Pampanga used to depend on rain water to irrigation their farms. Children would then catch the frogs, which came out during the rainy season, while their parents cultivated the land or planted rice. Outwitting the frogs has been a traditional “family bonding” ritual. Betute is a play of words on butete, which means “tadpole” in the local dialect. Betute is the entire frog stuffed with minced pork – so it looks like a very fat frog. It is then deep-fried in oil.

9. Mole Crickets
“Kamaru”

kamaru

Is a mole cricket that burrows in the moist soil of growing rice fields of Pampanga. These mole crickets are the most delicious pulutan in Pampanga, a foodie province known for delicious dishes, the country’s best cooks and most discriminating gourmands. The kamaro catchers stomp their bare feet on the soil to make the crickets surface, causing them to jump and fly awkwardly, making them easy to catch. cooking them is even more laborious. The cricket’s legs and wings must be removed, after which the body is boiled in vinegar and garlic. It is then sauteed in oil, chopped oinion and tomatoes until they are chocolate brown in color. Kamaro is a party in your mouth with every bite: the initial crunch gives way to a moist interior, making it a perfect pairing with ice-cold beer. Without the wings and legs, there is no scratchy texture.

8.Woodworm
“Tamilok”

tamilok

It Is woodworm found in driftwoods and is common in the provinces of Agusan del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Surigao del Norte, Surigao del Sur and Davao provinces. Tamilok is not for the squeamish nor the faint of heart. The experience of eating it is more risque than eating sushi. Forget raw, these worms are eaten alive! The driftwood is chopped so you are able to extract pink juicy worms measuring six to eight inches long. The worms are then washed then dropped onto the tounge. Fans love the clean taste and the tingling sensation through the digestive tract.

7. Ant Eggs

ant eggs

Known as the caviar of Ilocos’ wealthy set, they are found on the branches of certain mango trees where these ants make their homes. You need an expert who can detect them from under the trees branches. Gathering them requires a light hand and fleet feet as the sound of foot steps makes these ants hide their eggs. Flat baskets are attached under the branches and the tree is shaken vigorously until the eggs fall into the baskets. These are fried in butter. the result: A crisp shell on th outside and creamy filling on the inside.

6. Fried beetle
“Prito o sinangag na salagubang”

bettle

This is common among provinces where mango trees abound where beetles usually thrive. It’s crunchy like its grasshopper counterpart.

5. Grasshopper or Locust
“Sinangag o adobong tipaklong o balang”

grasshoper

4. Snail
“Ginataang kuhol “

snail

There are varieties of snails being cooked and eaten in the Philippines. Only two are being shown here. Ginataang kuhol or suso is sautéed with garlic, onion, ginger and pepper plus coconut milk. There are also other ways of cooking these snails.

3. Huge Worms
“Fried/Sautéed Huge Worms”

worms

This one is what I consider the most bizarre of them all. These worms can be found on rotten trees or rotten stack of rice hays. They are usually cooked by deep frying it. It can also be sautéed with garlic, onion, tomato and pepper. I haven’t tasted this one yet.

2. Shrimp Jumping Salad

shrimps

It is called jumping salad because the shrimps are prepared alive and eaten alive. Spiced up with citrus juice or grated unripe mango, salt and msg. as easy as that.

1. Balot

balot

This is a 2 to 3 week-old hatched duck egg (with embryo), which is hard- boiled. It can be spiced up with salt, vinegar w/ diced garlic and onion, and chili.

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